Silver Rose aka "Bones"

A couple days ago I was cruising Facebook when I best short term loan sites saw a post that caught my attention.  A Gal named Erin stated she had a horse named Silver Rose who was dumped in her pasture late at night.  Erin was asking if anyone would be willing to help her out with the care of this horse through the winter.  I asked her to share her story with me and this is what she had to say:

“This is Silver Rose, aka Bones….She came to us about 4 months ago.  She was dumped in our pasture, skin and bones with other medical issues, late at night.  While we have addressed her medical is payday loan legal in nc needs, her on going care is going to be expensive. We were informed by our vet she is in her 30′s and we are expecting another harsh winter, so that means extra feedings for Rose and special hay. We were not prepared for this expense but don’t want to abandoned her. We have looked into rescues but most say they don’t have room. We were not looking to take on another horse going into winter, but we are committed to trying to make sure she gets what she needs. She has come a long way in her short time here.  She was headed cash splash on the trailer with a local kill buyer, but he dumped her here because everyone knows I take care of my animals. It is draining on us as my husband is a disabled vet and I recently took on a part time job. We have our other horses and animals to care for магазин кондиционеров в витебской области also But we promised her she would be comfortable here till she tells us it is time.”

Bones1 Bones2 bones3 bones4 bones5

Erin is located in South West Virginia and she can be reached through her YouCaring campaign by clicking here.

Livingston county farm crawl

“There is just bad credit loans oceanside ca a pure feeling of satisfaction when you wake up in the morning to this life and realize…OH my Gosh!!  we did it…” Melinda, Cherokee Winds

Hey Homesteaders!  I’d like to introduce you to a group of super neat ladies who are passionate about self sufficiency, homesteading, and providing for their families in a more natural way. Meet  Deborah from Antiquity Oaks, Cheryl from Farmer in Odell, Melinda from Cherokee Winds, Janet from Eden’s Harvest, Kat from M2A Farm.

The ladies raise a variety of animals.  Hens, goats, American Guinea Hogs, peafowl, rabbits, ducks, sheep, turkeys, horses, llamas, donkeys, dogs, cats, alpacas and bees.  They use the animals to supply for the family but also to supplement income by making soaps, cheeses, honey, fleece and so much more.  Many of them sell at local farmer’s markets and on their websites.    Their farms vary in size and location but their stories are all inspirational.  I took some time to ask them a few questions and will be visiting them at the Farm Crawl on August 17th (get your free ticket here).  This is what they had to say.

P.S. Deborah is the author of one of my go-to books Homegrown and Handmade.  Check out my reading list here to get a copy!

Mrs HH: How did you get started?

Deborah: In 2002 we moved out here with no experience in livestock at all beyond our two cats and a poodle. I read a lot of books and found mentors over the Internet. Then we dove in and started making a lot of mistakes! But we stuck with it, learned a lot, and had a lot of fun. I expect we’ll be learning and having fun forever out here.

Deborah’s buff orphington hen

Cheryl: In 1997 my husband, Keith, got a job far enough cash generator loans online out of the suburbs that we were able to move out to the country where we’d wanted to be since before we were married.  We actually moved in late ’98.  Our main purpose was to be as self-sufficient as possible and we started out with a large vegetable garden plus ducks and geese for meat and eggs.  We also started planting fruit trees.

Cheryl’s son Andrew

“Sometimes it;s hard to get moving, but once I’m out there, I usually get lost in what I’m doing and totally enjoy every minute.” Deborah, Antiquity Oaks

Melinda: My farm purpose is to grow,  produce or make EVERYTHING I can from scratch..all natural.  The least amount of store of factory prepared stuff.  I make my own soaps..bath,  Laundry,  cleaning supplies..ect.  We can and freeze everything we grow…we produce our own Honey,  eggs,  herbs,  veggies,  some fruits and berries that’s growing bigger every year.  I got started officially in August of 2000 when we purchased our little farm.

 

Janet: We had wanted to live in the country for years.  When we finally made the move we put our gardening experience to work and started selling our produce.  We love it and everyday are thankful to be living in the country.

Sunset at Eden’s Harvest

Kat: By 2003, with the house paid off, on my second marriage (got it right this time), kids grown and self-sufficient, and with my mom living with us, I made up my mind to go after my lifelong dream of a rural lifestyle. Thankfully, Ron and my mom Lydia were up for the adventure.  We finally found a beautiful place just west of Dwight, IL. It had a nice ranch house (easy for Lydia), that didn’t need to be painted (big plus short term loans bad credit no credit check for Ron), a stocked pond, large shed, and mature trees (we didn’t have time to wait for seedlings to grow). I wanted more than the almost-6 acres, but when your mom says she could die happy if she could spend just one night on the place, you seal the deal. We’ve never regretted it. Lydia got 2 and a half happy years here before she died. That alone was priceless. We also got some of the best neighbors ever.

M2A Farm Alpaca

“Time flies, whether you’re having fun or not, and since odds are you don’t know what you’re expiration date is, you might as well enjoy every minute!” Kat, M2A Farm

Mrs HH: Why is the Farm Crawl important to you?

Deborah: I like to let people see our farm so that they can see how food used to be grown and how it could still be grown. Educating people about their food is really important to me. They need to know that chickens can happily co-exist without being debeaked as long as they are allowed to live outside like chickens were meant to live. And mama pigs can raise their babies outside, and those pigs can be healthy and don’t need antibiotics in their feed every day to stay healthy. Knowledge is power, and when people lose the knowledge of basic food production it is easy for Big Ag to come along and convince people that animals need antibiotics daily to survive or that they are debeaking chickens for their own protection. But the reality is that animals survived since the beginning of time without antibiotics or debeaking or any of the other inhumane and unhealthy practices that are common in modern agriculture. The simple fact is that factory farming created a lot of payday loans in lawndale ca problems that have to be solved with high tech answers — or simply return to raising animals naturally like we do!

One of Deborah’s little lambs

Cheryl: The farm crawl has been important in a few ways.  First, we’ve been able to educate people on how you can do some homesteading on such a small piece of land.  People think you need 10 or 20 acres, but we’ve been able to do a lot with a little land.  The only downfall is that we have to buy almost all the food the animals need.  But, we’ve learned that weeds make excellent goat and pig food.  Free range chickens eat most of the bugs we get over the spring, summer and fall.  Grass can be left to dry and then raked up and saved to feed to the goats or pigs later.  The same is true for leaves in the fall.  We can also grow squash for the animals, which they love.  There are a lot of people that would like to do what we’re doing and this gives them hope.  We’ve also been able to give them ideas on how to homestead in the yards they already have in the ‘burbs or the city, or even with an apartment balcony.  Second, though we’ve been here 14 years, we’ve met very few of our true neighbors.  Being half a mile or more apart means you don’t meet them when you happen to be outside together.  Now and again we get the wrong mail or a dog shows up here and we contact its owner, but that’s rare.  We realized a few years ago  that we’ve been talked about by the neighbors and they don’t know what to think of us!  The first Crawl gave them an excuse to show up payday loan with same day deposit and look around and find out what is really going on here – it was great fun to meet them and show them around.  And, third, it has helped provide a little income for us.  We sold a lot of soap and other bath and body products last year.  This year we’re expanding what we are selling a little bit to test the waters and see what people want.  Some of those customers have come back a few times to buy more soap, or told friends who then came over and bought a few bars.  It’s not a lot, but business is growing a little bit.  I suppose there is one more benefit.  Our younger children were out there helping show people around, telling them stories about the animals and helping with the soap sales.  That they’ve had that experience is priceless to me.

A few of Cheryl’s goat milk products

“I get to watch the kittens play while I am milking the goats or watch the piglets nursing.  It’s so beautiful.” Cheryl, Farmer in Odell

Melinda: Farm Crawl is important to show people it CAN BE DONE,  yes it takes work and dedication but it is worth all you put into it.  It does not get any better than this…I was born and raised in Chicago and Hubby in McHenry..if 2 city transplants can do it..so can they.  There is just a pure feeling of satisfaction when you wake up in the morning to this life and realize…OH my Gosh!!  we did it…

Melinda’s Prince Harry

Janet: It’s an opportunity for exposure of our farm business.  It’s also fun to meet other people of all backgrounds that are interested in visiting a farm.

Some of Janet’s cash advance in Lexington-Fayette turkeys

Kat: We didn’t know how we’d use the golf-course-like grounds, at least not for the first two months. Then a man from the county assessor’s office showed up and said they were going by the “current and best use of the land” to reassess us from “agriculture” to “residential”. WHAT??!!! We were surrounded by corn and beans and had specifically searched for land with an agricultural designation. I told the man we were going to get chickens and he said, “Chickens aren’t agriculture.” Suggested a horse, but he said it had to be a breeding operation. With both of us too old and broken down to breed horses, Ron declined my suggestion of “the expensive hobby” of miniature horses. Long story less long: the assessor said, “You’re not a farm.” So we got alpacas and told him, “Am TOO a farm!” Since our last name begins with “M” and two of us were the farmers, we became M2A Farm. (I leave the “dammit” part off for propriety’s sake.) We make every effort to treat our customers and visitors with the courtesy, ethics, and respect with which we would want to be treated. Family-friendly, educational tours in a small, intimate setting allow visitors the opportunity to enjoy a little time in the fresh country air, learn something, share experiences, and make new friends.

Kat’s guard dogs

My favorite part of homesteading is having a morning cup of coffee on the screened in porch with family and looking out to the fields and listening to the birds singing.  My least favorite thing is when I have to leave home.” Janet, Eden’s Harvest Farm

Please consider visiting this year’s Farm Crawl with me.  You can find more information on their site here.

You can also learn more about each of these super neat ladies by visiting their сколько стоит кондиционер в минске sites 
Deborah from Antiquity Oaks
Cheryl from Farmer in Odell
Melinda from Cherokee Winds
Janet from Eden’s Harvest
Kat from M2A Farm

 


Happy Homesteading!

 

 

Horse Theft and other naughty stuff…..part 1

If you are on facebook emergency funeral loans at all and you have a horse, you have probably seen at least a few posts about horse theft.  It seems like almost daily I see a new post “help me find my horse, it was stolen from my pasture last night!”  So I started to wonder…….is horse theft making a comeback and how can I protect myself?

Don’t be dumb

Yes, I said it-Don’t be dumb!  I have heard of a few cases where boarders were called and told their animals had died and disposal was already taken care of, only to find out the horse was sold.  Often times at horse shows a thief will offer you a check on the spot for your horse and you will never see the money or the horse again.  However, more commonly horses are being stolen from pastures in the middle of the night.

Locked Pastures

I’m a little on the fence on this one.  While it is a great deterrent for a pay off direct loans online would be thief, it also makes getting a horse out of the pasture in an emergency difficult.  Never EVER lock your animals in a barn or stall.  If there is a fire or other urgent situation, you have no way to get them out quickly.  Also, if someone is intent on stealing your animal, they will be prepared and will most likely bring tools to cut through locks and fencing.

Electric fencing

I like this one, electric fencing keeps people and animals away.  However, unless your control panel and battery is in a locked room…..it’s easy to get passed this one too.

Cameras and lights

They don’t even have to be real.  A dummy camera will still make a thief think twice about breaking into a barn.  Just make sure you are not mounting a camera onto a tree.  A real affordable way to place cameras in your barn would be a trail camera.  You can find them at every single what is a cash credit loan sporting goods store.  Many people use them around their coops and barns simply to see what predators need to be kept at bay.  The same is true for motion lights.  A few years ago m car was broken into.  The police said they only hit homes that did not have lights in the driveway.  Energy saving be dammed, I got a flood light.  Place signs that say you have video surveillance and test your lights often.  This is probably my favorite deterrent.

Microchips and branding

Some people are really against branding…..we breed Warmbloods so we brand, however the brands are not unique at all.  Microchips are also a great option, but both of these are only going to help after your horse is missing.

Guards

Yep-guards.  I was at an inspection last year in Wisconsin.  There were tons of high end, very expensive horses there and the stalls were all at a fairgrounds outside of town.  The organizer had her son stay cash advance bbb the night to keep an eye on things.  She knew that the horses there were valuable and easy targets since there were also a bunch of trailers sitting around.  I thought this was a cool way to keep our minds at ease when leaving our mare and foal for the night.

Ok, so lets say the unthinkable happens…..now what?  Look on craigslist.  Look all over craigslist in your surrounding areas.  People will put all kinds of stuff on the internet thinking they are anonymous.  I assure you, they can be found.  Next-cruise the local auctions and sale barns.  Search youtube videos, facebok and horse ads.   Ask around at feed stores and vet clinics.  Horse people talk and if someone knows something, chances are good you will hear about it.

There is a fantastic site called netposse.com and they have a TON of info on helping you find your missing кондиционеры электролюкс в могилевской области animal

 Happy homesteading!

 

 

 

 

microchips

coggins

 

 

Introducing our little prince

Like a proud momma :)

Our little guy fast cash hobart is here!  No name yet, but it has to personal references for loans start with an S……

 

So sleepy

 

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It’s hard work watching your brother/grandson quick loans longview tx be born!!

 

Happy Homesteading!!

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Foal Prep

Our sweet baby girl Denira JAX 32221 cash advance is ready to pop, this is how we prepped.

Baby has shifted, bagging, vulva has begun to relax, rear is soft and loose. Signs to look for when getting ready to foal.

Get a foaling stall ready.

In our case we needed a pretty big area because Denira is a big girl.  Her stall is 12×24 feet.  We stripped and cleaned it really well then added a fresh layer of straw.  We use straw for a few reasons.  It is warmer than pine shavings and cleaner.  The straw will not stick to a new baby or clog their personal loan to income ratio little airways right off the bat.  It is also harder to clean up so we hold off adding it as long as we can.  This has been a particularly cold spring so we added it last week, just in case she was to go early.  You will also need to foal proof similar to baby proofing.  Look around and make sure there are no places a tiny hoof could get stuck.  I’ve seen even adult horses get feet stuck in some really tight places.

Fresh straw

Look for gaps larger than an inch joint unsecured personal loans or two

We used PVC to cover the joints in our stalls. They are portable stalls so they have gaps at each corner.

Listen.

We have a baby monitor in the barn next to the foaling stall.  We can hear if Denira starts labor and be out there to assist.  Foaling happens in about 20 minutes, so being able to rush out there is key.

baby monitor to listen for signs of foaling. Could be water breaking, moaning or the other horses making unusual noises.

A foaling kit.

We have the following central loan items ready in our kit:

  • Lugols Iodine for the umbilical stump-it is CRUCIAL you keep this area clean
  • towels and blankets for drying off a new baby
  • tail wrap (we use a polo wrap)
  • gloves
  • flashlight
  • plastic bag or bucket to store the placenta/afterbirth (you will need to keep it for the vet to check)
  • mild soap
  • Baby enema in case your foal does not pass the meconium
  • scissors

Your vet should be aware that your mare is ready and will most likely want to see mom and baby the next day.  We also try to keep the mare in her foaling stall for a few weeks before she is ready.  This will ensure she is comfortable and feels safe.

While most foals are born at night, there are times they will be born in the middle of the day.  This happened to us once, Denira’s mom had a foal in the middle of a pasture a few days early and while there were other horses around.  Not an ideal situation!  Now we keep the mares separated about 2 weeks out.  Close enough to see her friends but in a separate сплит кондиционер в могилеве pen

Foaling is a pretty exciting time, make sure you are prepared!

Happy homesteading!